Everything we do produces a carbon footprint. To lower our individual greenhouse gas emissions, a great place to start would be your kitchen. Being efficient with food storage, using appliances that conserve electricity, and selecting materials used for kitchen cabinets can have a tremendous impact.

KCMA Certified Kitchen Cabinets

Lowering the impact on the environment is very important to our clients. The Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturers Association is an organization that validates the quality and durability of produced cabinets. They have also created the Environmental Stewardship Program which certifies any eco-friendly cabinets manufactured. This certification is a great indication for those homeowners seeking kitchen and bathroom cabinets manufactured with more eco-friendly practices. For more information, visit the Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturer’s Association at kcma.orgWhenever you buy cabinetry with the ESP seal, you know they have been certified by KCMA as meeting the standards for its “Environmental Stewardship Program” (ESP).

Being eco-friendly doesn’t mean giving up on style; in fact, quite the opposite. Check out this awesome bamboo kitchen Ken Kelly designed for a client’s kitchen in New York. Reused and recycled materials also give a classic touch to any kitchens going for that vintage look. We know because we do it all the time. Take a look at this kitchen designed with recycled materials.

Conserving Resources and Energy

An average person uses about 80 to 100 gallons of water per day, but this number can be lowered by using WaterSense labeled bathroom sink faucets. WaterSense is a program sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It is both a label for water-efficient products and an indicator for consumers looking to conserve their water usage. A WaterSense labeled sink faucet is about 30 percent more efficient than your standard faucet, and it still provides sufficient flow without sacrificing performance. 

High-efficiency Energy Star appliances can significantly reduce energy usage in your home, helping you create a greener kitchen. Upgrading to an Energy Star-rated appliance also allows you to take advantage of rebates, tax credits, or sales tax exemptions for energy-efficient products that your state and local utilities may offer.  An energy-saving refrigerator feature to look for is a design that not only maximizes food freshness but also incorporates smart organization to reduce the open-door time needed to find food, further lowering energy consumption. Refrigerators with drawers that open separately will limit the amount of cold air escaping while opening.

Energy efficient windows, also known as energy-saving windows, are designed to prevent your heated or cooled air from escaping from your home. They are double layered or coated glass that insulate efficiently, saving you about 25-35% on heating or cooling energy use. The same insulating qualities these windows provide also helps keep sound out, so your home will be more quiet overall. It is extremely helpful if you live in a busy neighborhood with barking dogs, lots of traffic, or nearby trains.

Looking to go green on your kitchen renovation project? Come visit our showroom for free in store consultation, our designers are experts in the field and will help you make the best possible decisions when selecting energy efficient appliances and eco-friendly materials for your kitchen and bath project.

Laundry Room Layout Ideas

When planning the layout of the laundry room space, include as much cabinetry as possible for ample storage, a countertop folding area, good room lighting, and ideally a hanging area, a hamper area, a sink, and maybe some open shelves.  You will want plenty of storage for accessories, linens, hampers, detergents, and cleaning supplies. An ideal laundry room includes room to fold clothes, iron, and store sewing and craft supplies for true convenience. Larger families often opt for a double set of washers and dryers. We also offer retractable clothes lines and hide-away ironing boards that are built into the cabinetry and then stored when not in use.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This