There is absolutely nothing better than using fresh herbs in my cooking. From whole leaves of basil in my tomato mozzarella salad, to rosemary in my mashed potatoes, to mint in my mojitos, to parsley in my pasta sauce….nothing tastes better than freshly grown herbs.

You have two options – purchase the packets of fresh herbs at your local grocer each time you need them and hope they’ll be available, or grow them yourself in a fresh herb garden in your kitchen! I happen to love the green color and the fresh scent of herbs on my kitchen windowsill. Most herbs can be grown year round indoors, and are very easy to maintain.

Below are a few accessories and herb pots to help keep your plants growing healthy while looking stylish in your kitchen, along with some herb tips I’ve learned the along the way.

 

  1. Herbs Trio, available at Royal Design
  2. Duo Herb Pot, available at Royal Design
  3. Herb Pot, frosted glass, 13 cm, available at Royal Design
  4. Herb Pot, frosted glass, 11cm, available at Royal Design
  5. Herb Pot, large, available at Royal Design
  6. Herb Pot, small, available at Royal Design
  7. Herb Stand, available at Royal Design
  8. Herb Scissor, available at Royal Design
  9. Herbs/Spices Trio Herb Pot, available at Royal Design
  10. Pot for fresh herbs, Citrus (Le Creuset) at Royal Design
  11. Herb Keeper, available at Uncommon Goods
  12. Herb Seed Kit, available at Uncommon Goods
  13. Elevated Garden Table
  14. Gro-Bot, available at Uncommon Goods
  15. Fish Lawn Sculpture, available at Uncommon Goods

 

See more designer finds here.

 

HERB TIPS I’VE TRIED THAT WORK WELL FOR INDOOR KITCHEN HERBS:

  • Purchase plants that have been grown indoors (not outdoors) to keep the environments the same (or start from seeds)
  • Clip your herbs to promote growth
  • Plant each variety of herbs in separate containers
  • Use organic potting soil
  • Water at the base. Some of the planters above have mini reservoirs (great for providing humidity)
  • Add a growing light if necessary. This helps if your window sill doesn’t get 5-6 hours of light, but be careful not to burn the plants

 

 

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